Oxford Video Travel Guides

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High Street

High Street

Oxford City, though small is known worldwide as a university town and home to the oldest university in England. The area was inhabited as far back as Saxon times, when the town took itís name as the ford of the oxen. Later it became a military post, watching over the regions of Mercia and Wessex.

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Further Reading on Wikipedia : High Street Oxford

Cornmarket Street

Cornmarket Street

The town had a bad experience during the Norman Invasion 1066, when it was taken over by the Normans, who built a castle in the town, remains of which still survive. A monastic community was established within the castle, and through the learningís and teachings of the monks Oxford started along its journey as being a centre of learning. Oxford was first settled in Saxon times and was initially known as "Oxenaforda", meaning "Ford of the Oxen"; fords were more common than bridges at that time.[10] It began with the establishment of a river crossing for oxen around AD 900. In the 10th century, Oxford became an important military frontier town between the kingdoms of Mercia and Wessex and was on several occasions raided by Danes. .

Further Reading on Wikipedia : Cornmarket Street

Oxford's River

Oxford's River

The Rivers Cherwell and Thames (The Thames was originally called Themesis and locally known as Isis) run through Oxfordís centre and meet. When the Oxford Canal was completed in 1790, Oxford was connected to Coventry. By the mid-1790s a second canal was built joining the Thames at Isis Lock. By mid 1840s Oxford was linked to London via the Great Western Railway. .

Further Reading on Wikipedia : Oxford River and canal

Broadstreet

Broadstreet

Oxford was granted a charter by King Henry II, allowing its citizens the same privileges as those in the capital. This brought expansion to the town and a number of religious orders such as Cistercian, Dominicans, Franciscans, Carmelites and Augustinians set up in the town. Oxford had become a university city by the 12th century. The earliest colleges were University College (1249), Balliol (1263) and Merton (1264). The learned at the colleges translated Greek writings which inspired advancements in the arts and science. The church supported the colleges in order to help bridge the gap between Greek philosophy and Christian theology.

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Further Reading on Wikipedia : Broad Street Oxford

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Copyright Moving Postcards Aug 22 2016

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